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Showing: 1-10 results of 5866

“[A]n excellent book...” --The Economist Financial Times Asia editor David Pilling presents a fresh vision of Japan, drawing on his own deep experience, as well as observations from a cross section of Japanese citizenry, including novelist Haruki Murakami, former prime minister Junichiro Koizumi, industrialists and bankers, activists and artists, teenagers and octogenarians. Through their voices, Pilling's Bending Adversity... more...

Conventional planning methods often do not suffice for complex institutions such as health systems and development projects, and this book introduces the practice of facilitated participatory planning (FPP), a new way of planning for a world that is multifaceted, competitive, and ever changing. The authors argue that involving all the key stakeholders in the process makes for a trustworthy, inclusive, balanced, and dynamic planning system. This... more...

Widely-known as the world’s most persecuted minority group, the Rohingya in Myanmar are now facing extinction. Denied citizenship rights, denied their very ethnic identity, hundreds of thousands have fled Rakhine State in Myanmar over the border into Bangladesh, where they face squalid conditions. Many have witnessed death, mutilation and rape, as well as whole villages, what they called home, burning to ashes. Leading British Muslim fi gure... more...

Veteran science writer Michael Balter skillfully weaves together many threads in this fascinating book about one of archaeology�s most legendary sites� �talh�y�k. First excavated forty years ago, the site is justly revered by prehistorians, art historians, and New Age goddess worshippers alike for its spectacular finds dating almost 10,000 years ago. Archaeological maverick Ian Hodder, leader of the recent re-excavation at this Turkish mound,... more...



Europe and China in the Cold War offers fresh and captivating scholarship on a complex relationship. Defying the divisions and hostilities of those times, national cases and personal experiences show that Sino-European connections were much more intense than previously thought.

Few gave tiny Singapore much chance of survival when it was granted independence in 1965. How is it, then, that today the former British colonial trading post is a thriving Asian metropolis with not only the world's number one airline, best airport, and busiest port of trade, but also the world's fourth-highest per capita real income.

The first general history in English of the Ottoman Army in the First World War, Ordered to Die is based on newly available Turkish archival and official sources. Outnumbered and outgunned, the Ottoman Army performed astonishingly well in the field and managed to keep fighting until the end of the war, long after many other armies had quit the field. It fought a multi-front war against sophisticated and capable enemies, including Great... more...

Presenting a succinct, historically informed introduction to North and South Korea, the second edition of The Koreas considers the radically different ways these countries have dealt with the growing challenges of globalization. Since the first edition’s publication, the economic, political, and social differences have only intensified, making evident the relevancy and importance of Armstrong’s work, in understanding the Koreas now... more...

This engaging guide traces the history, cultivation, and culture of coffee, as well as the major factors influencing the industry today. Robert Thurston provides a readable, concise overview of coffee from the time the seeds of the coffee fruit are planted to the latest ideas in roasting and making beverages. He considers cultivation and its challenges, especially climate change; new research on hybridization; the history of coffee and... more...