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Showing: 1-10 results of 3735

From the earliest engineers such as Archimedes and Hero of Alexandria, heroes of the Industrial Revolution like Eli Whitney and Alessandro Volta, and pioneers of the Modern Age with Henry Ford and Wernher von Braun, Engineers looks at more than eighty of the world's greatest engineers — who they were, what they did, and how their projects shaped the course of human history. The only book to feature engineers from every era of human history and... more...

An innovative and illuminating look at how the evolution of the human species has been shaped by the world around us, from anatomy and physiology, to cultural diversity and population density. Where did the human species originate? Why are tropical peoples much more diverse than those at polar latitudes? Why can only Japanese peoples digest seaweed? How are darker skin, sunlight, and fertility related? Did Neanderthals and Homo... more...

The history of the sciences and the history of the book are complementary, and there has been much recent innovative research in the intersection of these lively fields. This accessibly-written, well-illustrated volume is the first systematic general work to do justice to the fruits of recent scholarship. The twenty specially-commissioned chapters cover the period from the Carolingian renaissance of learning to the mid-nineteenth-century consolidation... more...


On a sunny morning in May 1939 a phalanx of 800 women - housewives, doctors, opera singers, politicians, prostitutes - were marched through the woods fifty miles north of Berlin, driven on past a shining lake, then herded through giant gates. Whipping and kicking them were scores of German women guards. Their destination was Ravensbrück, a concentration camp designed specifically for women by Heinrich Himmler, prime architect of the Nazi genocide.... more...


From world-renowned economist Paul Collier, a candid diagnosis of the failures of capitalism and a pragmatic and realistic vision for how we can repair it. Deep new rifts are tearing apart the fabric of the United States and other Western societies: thriving cities versus rural counties, the highly skilled elite versus the less educated, wealthy versus developing countries. As these divides deepen, we have lost the sense of ethical... more...

This book offers an authoritative and accessible introduction to the New Testament and early Christian literature for all students of the Bible and anyone interested in the origins of Christianity. It is designed primarily for undergraduate courses in the New Testament, biblical studies and early Christianity. There are questions for in-class discussion and written assignment, step-by-step reading guides on individual works, special box features,... more...

Crosbie Smith explores the trials and tribulations of first-generation Victorian mail steamship lines, their passengers, proprietors and the public. Eyewitness accounts show in rich detail how these enterprises engineered their ships, constructed empire-wide systems of steam navigation and won or lost public confidence in the process. Controlling recalcitrant elements within and around steamship systems, however, presented constant challenges to... more...

A series of detective stories supposed to be told to a portrait-painter by his sitters; the framework tells us how he came to think of publishing the stories thus collected; the introductions describe the circumstances under which the tales were told. These portions have a delicate every-day interest. The tales are stories of adventure, well varied, and often striking in the incidents, or with thrilling situations; and are as pleasant reading as a... more...