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Showing: 1-10 results of 17465

This handbook provides a unique and in-depth survey of the current state-of-the-art in software engineering, covering its major topics, the conceptual genealogy of each subfield, and discussing future research directions. Subjects include foundational areas of software engineering (e.g. software processes, requirements engineering, software architecture, software testing, formal methods, software maintenance) as well as emerging areas... more...

This book aims to capture the fundamentals of computer programming without tying the topic to any specific programming language. To the best of the authors’ knowledge there is no such book in the market.

It's nearly impossible to build a competent Go-playing machine using conventional programming techniques, let alone have it win. By applying advanced AI techniques, in particular deep learning and reinforcement learning, users can train their Go-bot in the rules and tactics of the game. Deep Learning and the Game of Go opens up the world of deep learning and AI by teaching readers to build their own Go-playing... more...

This is the first comprehensive study of an ingenious number-notation from the Middle Ages that was devised by monks and mainly used in monasteries. A simple notation for representing any number up to 99 by a single cipher, somehow related to an ancient Greek shorthand, first appeared in early-13th-century England, brought from Athens by an English monk. A second, more useful version, due to Cistercian monks, is first attested in the late 13th century... more...

FROM THE PREFACE In the years since the first edition, I have continued to consider ways in which the texts could be improved. In this regard, I researched several topics including how people learn (learning styles, etc.), how the brain functions in storing and retrieving information, and the fundamentals of memory systems. Many of the changes incorporated in this second edition are a result of this research. The changes were field-tested during a... more...


Suitable for newcomers to computer science, A Concise Introduction to Programming in Python provides a succinct, yet complete, first course in computer science using the Python programming language. The book features: Short, modular chapters with brief and precise explanations, intended for one class period Early introduction of basic procedural constructs such as functions, selection, and repetition, allowing them to be used... more...

From Rubik's cubes to Godel's incompleteness theorem, everything mathematical explained, with colour illustrations, in half a minute. Maths is enjoying a resurgence in popularity. So how can you avoid being the only dinner guest who has no idea who Fermat was, or what he proved? The more you know about Maths, the less of a science it becomes. 30 Second Maths takes the top 50 most engaging mathematical theories, and explains them to the general reader... more...

An Active Learning Approach to Teaching the Main Ideas in Computing Explorations in Computing: An Introduction to Computer Science and Python Programming teaches computer science students how to use programming skills to explore fundamental concepts and computational approaches to solving problems. Designed for CS0 and CS1 courses, the book gives beginning students an introduction to computer science concepts and computer programming.... more...

This book contains the courses given at the Fourth School on Statistical Physics and Cooperative Systems held at Santiago, Chile, from 12th to 16th December 1994. This School brings together scientists working on subjects related to recent trends in complex systems. Some of these subjects deal with dynamical systems, ergodic theory, cellular automata, symbolic and arithmetic dynamics, spatial systems, large deviation theory and neural networks.... more...

Cellular automata are a class of spatially and temporally discrete mathematical systems characterized by local interaction and synchronous dynamical evolution. Introduced by the mathematician John von Neumann in the 1950s as simple models of biological self-reproduction, they are prototypical models for complex systems and processes consisting of a large number of simple, homogeneous, locally interacting components. Cellular automata have been the... more...